Reflections on the film Mbeti: The Road to Kisesini

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Reflections on the film Mbeti: The Road to Kisesini

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Filmmaker Ann Bromberg (center) on location in Kenya

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Reflections by the Pencils for Africa Team after viewing the film

“Mbeti: The Road to Kesisini” by filmmaker Ann Bromberg

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Nicolas, Editor-in-Chief

In our modern societal times, especially in big cities, it seems like giving birth is a trivial event in terms of safety. Especially in Marin County, there are many safe, excellent, and reliable hospitals in the area.

What I just realized is that, in rural areas in Africa, there are many cases where a pregnant woman cannot get the help they need for a safe birth. The short documentary film that the PFA team recently saw last week, Mbeti: The Road to Kisesini, addressed this issue.

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There is an important organization that builds hospitals and provides ambulance services for poor villages in Africa.

It was interesting to know that this simple provision of medical supplies and trained doctors can save the lives of both the newborn baby and the woman giving birth. I am very excited to be sharing this video with others during the PFA Film Festival and I am looking forward to leaving a positive experience on many people who get to view this film.

What I just realized is that, in rural areas in Africa, there are many cases where a pregnant woman cannot get the help they need for a safe birth. 

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The short film that the PFA team recently saw last week, Mbeti: The Road to Kisesini, addressed this issue.

— Nicolas

Colin

Colin, Deputy Editor

I was truly inspired by this movie that we watched.

It showed how simple acts can change people’s lives.

The movie starts off by talking about leaders in a small community in Africa who work to not only better themselves, but better the lives of the people that they lived with.

This small act of kindness grew until people outside of their community took interest and decided to help them out. They did not take over the project, but instead worked to help the birth center grow.

Overall, the movie showed me the value of human kindness.

Overall, the movie showed me the value of human kindness.

— Colin

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Carly

Carly, Assistant Editor and PFA Film Festival Co-Founder

Mbeti: The Road to Kisesini was such a moving and inspiring film to watch.

First, this film talked about the struggles of those in Africa.

For example, the lack of clean water to drink and the lack of medical supplies. Through these struggles, Mbeti teaches her tribe to stay positive by selling and weaving baskets, dancing, singing, and smiling.

I believe that this film would be a great addition to the 2015 PFA Film Festival (click here for the website).

I believe that this film would be a great addition to the 2015 PFA Film Festival (click here for the PFA Film Festival)

— Carly

 

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CharlottePFACharlotte, Assistant Editor and PFA Film Festival Co-Founder

I loved watching the movie, Mbeti: Road to Kisesini, because above all it showed how much love the community had for each other.

Seeing the beautiful baskets they weaved to sell and seeing each woman donate her time and money was truly inspiring.

Our PFA group talked about Ubuntu, community, and this was truly the power of Ubuntu. The hospital saved so many children and mothers from death as well. This movie was truly inspiring to watch and it shows the power of Ubuntu in the African culture.

This movie was truly inspiring to watch and it shows the power of Ubuntu in the African culture.

— Charlotte

Ella, PFA Visiting Scholar

The documentary film we watched on Thursday mentioned some interesting points, and I realized a lot about the way of life and livelihood in Kenya.

It noted that Mbeti had drive, and it was obvious this sprouted from her wanting to help. But when did she discover she wanted to aid her village? Here I dug deeper. As I watched he film, I looked into the backround of the village: Everywhere villagers, workers, children and mothers alike would drink foul water, walk miles for care or work in poor conditions. And they were indifferent. This was their life, living in conditions I could not imagine experiencing or consider even halfway normal – and they were okay with it.

This touched me in a mixture of horror and awe.

I think Mbeti felt the same way. When she saw that people were totally fine living this way and going about their lives, she knew she needed to help. That is where the drive came from. Mbeti had a passion most villagers did not have the will to have or couldn’t afford to have, and her innovation and will aided the village to bring itself together.

Mbeti had a passion most villagers did not have the will to have or couldn’t afford to have, and her innovation and will aided the village to bring itself together.

— Ella

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Elizabeth, PFA Visiting Scholar

Watching the short film, “Mbeti: The Road to Kesisini”, was very inspiring and moving to me. It’s amazing to see how women in this small village live and how far they have to walk just to get to the nearest clinic.

It’s sad to think about these women being pregnant and having to walk many miles just to give birth, with the threat of death looming over them. However, it’s great to know that PFA is helping to get bicycles through, Bicycles Against Poverty, for villages like Kesisini, so women can afford to get to the clinics when they are pregnant.

It’s amazing to see how women in this small African village live and how far they have to walk just to get to the nearest clinic.

— Elizabeth

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Lucia's Question

Lucia, Assistant Editor and PFA Film Festival Co-Founder

Watching Ann Bromberg’s short film really captured the essence of Africa in a whole.

The video was truthful. It made you think, sit, and realize about the world and how fortunate we are.

I loved hearing the joy some of the women had. Not only joy but love and compassion that Mbeti had towards the other women.

Mbeti had the spirit and energy to encourage and move the community towards solutions to drinking clean water and achieving the a birthing clinic, she is a very inspirational person to me.

Mbeti had the spirit and energy to encourage and move the community towards solutions to drinking clean water and achieving the a birthing clinic, she is a very inspirational person to me.

— Lucia

 

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ShannonPFAShannon, Assistant Editor and PFA Film Festival Co-Founder

I thought the film was absolutely wonderful and inspiring.

I remember Mrs. Weitzman and Mr. Ajania emphasizing to us at PFA that we cannot take one big step to fix the world, we have to take small steps and set small goals in order to start the rippling affect of something bigger.

That principle really came into play with this movie.

Mbeti, a woman from Kesisini, saw women in her area struggling with pregnancy and child birth, and so she worked hard with some help from other great men and women to create a child birthing clinic, where women could go for a safer delivery. Now women in her area are better off when it comes to childbirth. This has definitely made a difference for the better.

We cannot take one big step to fix the world, we have to take small steps and set small goals in order to start the rippling affect of something bigger.

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Mbeti (pictured above), a woman from Kisesini, saw women in her area struggling with pregnancy and child birth, and so she worked hard with some help from other great men and women to create a child birthing clinic, where women could go for a safer delivery.

— Shannon